The Violet Fern

Creating Art & Gardens


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What’s Blooming: June Bloom

It’s been rainy here but today in June, the sun blooms. Purple podded peas … blooming in the sun.

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Also in the Potager, herbs like chives and thymes are in flower. Borage is on the brink.

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Chamomile (and Vetch) running rampant.

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A first, Ornamental Clover, Trifolium Rubens, just beginning to bloom. (Last year the rabbits mowed it down.)

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Just beginning, the first drops of Oenothera, in the Bird & Butterfly Garden (a blue and yellow stage along with Lady’s Mantle, Cranesbill).

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Baptisia Twilite Prairieblues …

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The Woodland Edge in its “Pink Fairy” stage with Tradescantia varieties brought to me by Jean’s Garden.

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Jack in the Pulpit lingers in the shadows.

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Flowering Raspberry, Rubus odoraus, is buzzing and vibrating with bees. Listen.

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Meadow phlox, Phlox maculata or Wild Sweet William is loaded.

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Flanked by Northern Blue Flag Iris.

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Opposite the Woodland Edge, in new Hosta Row, Heucheras ‘Caramel’ and ‘Pinot Blanco’ soak up the sun.

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Gazania Kiss Frosty Mix, kissed by the sun, out front where the sun is full.

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Superfinia Petunia Lavender Lace in a window box.

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A sweet seat on the front porch next to what I’ve dubbed as “hummingbird honey suckle.”

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On the other side you can see the waterfall of blooms.

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Sitting on the front porch you can take in the scent of Dianthus Greystone.

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Chives and Catmint Walker’s Low line the sidewalk.

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Common Milkweed is just beginning to bloom (IN the sidewalk), but I’ve yet to see a Monarch here in my garden.

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If I were a Monarch, I would visit Carol at May Dreams Gardens for a great list of blooming gardens on Garden Blogger’s Bloom Day.

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What’s Blooming: Flowering Raspberry & Blue Flag

Here it is, June, the transition from Spring to Summer. In spite of my new bunny ranch, I have blooms – it is a miracle! Those bunnies are ravenous and I am considering my first BB gun – not really, only at certain moments such as when I discovered the Morning Glory was eaten to the ground in a blaze of glory. Although discouraged, I do have to remind myself that I chose to garden for wildlife. Here it is!

Bunny Ranch

Things will live through this bunny boom or they won’t and that is gardening. Here’s what’s on the menu and a portion of what’s blooming in the Violet Fern Garden this garden bloggers’ bloom day hosted by Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

The Woodland Edge is peppered in pinks and purples. For dessert? Flowering Raspberry.

Goats Beard

Goats Beard and Summer Containers in the Woodland Edge

Spiderwort and Columbines

Spiderwort (Tradescantia Osprey), Jacob’s Ladder and Columbines in the Woodland Edge

Blue Flag Iris

Blue Flag Iris II

Our native Blue Flag Iris

Primrose

Primrose (Primula x bulleesiana)

Amsonia

Amsonia x Blue Ice, Blue Star and Allium Moly

Wild Raspberry and Phlox

Flowering Raspberry (Rhus odoratus), and Wild Sweet William or Meadow Phlox (Phlox maculata)

The Bird & Butterfly Garden is buttered in yellow.

Evening Primrose and Ladys Mantle

Evening Primrose (Oenothera) and Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla Mollis)

Ladys Mantle in the Rain

Lady’s Mantle (Alchemilla Mollis) after a rain

Baptisia

Baptisia ‘Twilite Prairieblues’

The Riverfront is laced with complex flavors.

Black Lace

Black Lace (Sambucus)

Walkers Low, Snow in Summer, Black Lace

Catmint Walkers Low (Nepeta), Snow in Summer (Cerastium tomentosum), Black Lace (Sambucus)

The Potager is an herbal delight.

Chamomile

Chamomile

Thyme and Purple Perilla

Thyme and Purple Perilla

Sedum from Kring Point

Sedum in a Potager path from a nearby park (I took a cutting)

The new Hosta Row is dotted with Caramel, Heuchera ‘Caramel.’ May I have a Pinot with that?

Coral Bells & Hollyhocks

Heucheras ‘Caramel’ and ‘Pinot Blanco,’ Hollyhocks in background in new section Hosta Row

Can I get you anything else for your dining pleasure? No? Well, thank you, dinner’s on me.


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April’s Featured Bee

The month of April in my North American Native Bee Calendar purchased from the Great Sunflower Project, features the Digger Bee, genus Anthophora. They may also be referred to as Longhorned Bees because males sport exceptionally long antennae. They emerge in early Spring to Summer depending on the species and mostly nest in the ground.

Most digger bees range from small to medium size. They are fuzzy – very furry, and some species display prominent black and white banding on the abdomen. They fly very fast and are able to hover before landing on a flower. Swarms of males can be seen cruising around nesting sites seeking emerging females. Digger bees typically have very long tongues.

You might find digger bees in your garden if you grow the following: salvia, lavender, nepeta/catnip, phacelia.

I hope to search for them in my front garden that I expanded just last fall.

This photo was taken of the front garden last week before the “big clean up.” Here I have growing lavender and nepeta walker’s low, as well as snow in summer, russian sage, lambs ears, iris and aster. Blooming are reticulated iris.

I noticed that I have quite a bit of action in my mason bee house right now. I cannot positively identify the bees flying in and out of here – they are fast and go in the holes before I can get a good look! Then they pop back out like little rockets. I believe they are collecting nectar and pollen. On the day I observed them it was sunny and warm – today, not so much.

 

Above is a close up. These holes are made from bamboo and go quite deep so I’ve yet to see a mud plug but I am keeping my fingers crossed. I will let you know of any progress. This house should last for several seasons and faces southwest.

In the meantime I’ll be in the garden among the bees.